September 9, 2011

Lessons for India from the magic of overseas Chinese!

The strength of the Chinese population can be gauged by the very fact that today around 19.3 per cent of world population is Chinese.

But then, such a figure based on the law of averages hides more than what it reveals. The figure that talks volumes about the Chinese sphere of influence, at least with respect to human capital, is that of 50 million plus overseas Chinese who are settled in various parts of the world and playing their bit in accelerating the fast-paced Chinese economy. Today, overseas Chinese not only pump money into the Chinese economy but also facilitate Chinese ambitions of global cultural and political colonisation. Overseas Chinese have made themselves inimitable in almost all spheres of influences – from heading many hard power areas by chairing vital positions in global forums, military and political institutions of many nations to being the face of various soft power areas of influence. One may not be well versed with the Chinese powers-that-be, but at the same time, very few would be not well versed with the likes of Jackie Chan!

The emigration of Chinese dates back to the Ming dynasty, but the real wave of Chinese diaspora started in 1840s when thousands of Chinese left China and made their way to the United States, especially after the discovery of gold in California. Initially, uneducated and unemployed Chinese labourers left their homes and moved to the US (for mining and railroad jobs); but then, during the late nineteenth century, the scenario changed. Instead of labourers, those were skilled and educated Chinese who moved out to avoid the ill effects of poverty and famine – which were haunting China in the late nineteenth century. However, this time the destination was not confined to the US or the West; many Asian nations suddenly made it to the destination list of Chinese. Among all the nations, Southeast Asia and Australia (apart from US) attracted the most Chinese. With more and more Chinese moving out of China, most of the big cities across the world saw a huge inflow of Chinese.

Gradually, these people moved and settled down in a more organised manner and formed strong communities across the globe. So much so that most of the renowned cities (in almost all nations) have a China located somewhere – which today we call ‘Chinatown.’

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17 comments:

preeti said...

Overseas Chinese not only pump money into China’s economy but also facilitate the fulfilment of Chinese ambitions of global cultural and political colonisation. The overseas Chinese have made themselves inimitable in all spheres of influencing official and popular perceptions of China. They also remit a lot of money home

suri said...

The People's Republic of China (PRC) ranks since 2010 as the world's second largest economy after the United States. It has been the world's fastest-growing major economy, with consistent growth rates of around 10% over the past 30 years. China is also the largest exporter and second largest importer of goods in the world. The country's per capita GDP (PPP) was $7,518 (International Monetary Fund, 93rd in the world) in 2010. The provinces in the coastal regions of China[7] tend to be more industrialized, while regions in the hinterland are less developed. As China's economic importance has grown, so has attention to the structure and health of that economy.[8][9]

Sunil Bhardwaj said...

what?what are you talking about?do you know how long Chinese history is?Chinese is an ethnic and cultural concept.you must be out of your mind,what makes you think you have the right to define we Chinese people.

preeti said...

The population of China doubled in size during the 10th and 11th centuries. This growth came through expanded rice cultivation in central and southern China, the use of early-ripening rice from southeast and southern Asia, and the production of abundant food surpluses A much larger populace also increased the importance of the lower gentry's role in grassroots administration and local affairs. Appointed officials in county and provincial centers relied upon the scholarly gentry for their services, sponsorship, and local supervision.

Sunil Bhardwaj said...

Well, I have my own opinion; however, according to zf, only Chinese who are citizens of PRC are Chinese. Chinese is not an ethnicity.

Therefore, there can be no such things as "overseas Chinese" except for PRC citizens living abroad who have not given up their citizenship.

sailaxmi said...

china is far developed and flourishing in technological skills...hope India also conquer such name in the world...because our country also have a lot of talented and well qualified people...

Sunil Bhardwaj said...

Overseas Chinese not only pump money into China’s economy but also facilitate the fulfilment of Chinese ambitions of global cultural and political colonisation. The overseas Chinese have made themselves inimitable in all spheres of influencing official and popular perceptions of China. They also remit a lot of money home

Sunil Bhardwaj said...

when I travelled the world... people would ask me "where are your from..."

"Canada"

no where were you Born

"Canada"

no where were your parents from

"Canada"

no what race are you???

sigh "Chinese"

simran said...

China’s ambitious, muscular rollout of high-visibility infrastructure projects – the fastest train, the tallest building, and the longest bridge, and so on – and the speed at which they get done have always inspired shock and awe in overseas audiences, and a sense of pride among Chinese people.

ANUP KUMAR said...

As a white, anglo-saxon protestant without a drop of Asian blood in my system, I would like to comment. I have visited China, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaya, San Francisco and other Asian countries for many years. I think the people in Singapore have the best understanding of 'overseas Chinese.' They hold to the language (even switching from Cantonese to Mandarin twenty years ago), and loyalty to things 'Chinese' (adj.) But they are very much citizens of Singapore with no desire to return to the land of their grandparents. They very much emphasize the OVERSEAS in overseas Chinese.Your Chinese friend seems very much a Mainland Chinese, with a bit of extreme chauvinism in her blood (party member?) In China, people consider overseas Chinese to be 100% Chinese; away from the mainland - not so much. Especially in the US and Canada, we all come from somewhere and wear it on our sleeves, but that's as far as it goes.

sailaxmi said...

A good article. I wish your blog reachs every Indian including those living abroad and not only Indians but others too. We all have a nice lesson to learn from the Chinese.

simran said...

Official Chinese media reported that after the power failure, the electronic safety system designed to warn trains of stalled rakes on the tracks up ahead was rendered useless.

ANUP KUMAR said...

Overseas Chinese as in a person of chinese desent who was born outside of China and raised in the country they were born in. Or left China when they were very young to other countries and have absorbed much of the culture of their host countries than Chinese culture itself.

simran said...

In other words, the Chinese authorities’ decision to press ahead with vanity projects at top speed could put the government on a collision course with Chinese people who appear to have momentarily lost their pride in being the fastest.

suri said...

The Chinese economy historically outpaces India's by just about every measure. China's fast-acting government implements new policies with blinding speed, making India's fractured political system appear sluggish and chaotic. Beijing's shiny new airport and wide freeways are models of modern development, contrasting sharply with the sagging infrastructure of New Delhi and Mumbai. And as the global economy emerges from the Great Recession, India once again seems to be playing second fiddle. Pundits around the world laud China's leadership for its well-devised economic policies during the crisis, which were so effective in restarting economic growth that they helped lift the entire Asian region out of the downturn.

simran said...

China’s infrastructural might, even if some of them are based on superficial observations during flying visits to China’s showcase cities. On occasion, they are often called out by commentators who have spent rather more time in China, and have a deeper appreciation of the nuances of the imbalances in the China infrastructure story.

Brijesh Chaudhuri said...

China earth power & all kind areas a unique identity in the world. chines people are vary strong instead of a vary large population. China's economic importance has grown. China a vary power full as a globally.

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