August 12, 2011

Chinese investments in Africa, a lesson for the world!

As London burns and USA is downgraded with fears of another recessionary wave hitting the world, there is one thing that becomes amply clear. You can’t have a world full of inequity and live in peace. Never before in its history has the gap between the rich and the poor widened as it has in the last 40 years in America. And every right wing party has only worked hard to enrich the rich. Every time the Democrats have come back and tried to increase even half a percent of tax on the rich to use it for those marginalized by the markets, the Republicans have screamed hoarse. No doubt, Obama has knowledge about economics, but what is happening in America right now is a shame, especially the way right wing fanatics are making the scene look worse than it is. The problem in UK is however another side of the same coin. The whites were sitting happily claiming that the blacks and other minorities live better in UK than they would have in their country of origin. However, happiness is a comparative phenomenon, and when the gap between the rich and the poor grows, the poor hit back. It has happened in France and now it’s happening in London and around. The lesson is clear – if we don't focus on decreasing this gap and have a global policy for the same, the world won’t see peace. And it has to happen at a global level with richer countries investing in the poorer nations. There is no other nation which is showing the way better than the Chinese are, by investing in Africa and helping it develop – no doubt with their own long run gains in mind. A look at the way they are going about it has huge lessons for Western nations as well as countries like India.

The Sino-African relationship dates back to beginning of 200 BC, when an explorer named Du Huan, during Tang dynasty, visited African countries (Sudan, Egypt and a few others) in pursuit of trade and commerce. The legacy that was initiated by Huan has never stopped. And particularly over the last few decades, the Chinese tilt towards Africa has been seemingly visible. Chinese premiers have been visiting Africa regularly since 1979 with Vice-premier Qian Qichen paying visits to more than 35 African countries between 1990 and 1998. If not this, what else could indicate Chinese intentions more but the fact that President Hu Jiantao made more than 17 visits to African nations during 2006-07 and then again, a four African countries’ tour in 2009 compared to just one visit to the US in the last 13 years! In all these years, the Chinese have consolidated their African engagement through their support to Africa during their liberation movements, which eventually took the shape of strategic partnerships in resource exploitation. Of course, most of the modern Sino-African ties have a shade of resource-grabbing rather than resource sharing.
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100 comments:

suri said...

Over the last four decades the country of Zambia has received the greatest amount of Chinese foreign direct investment in Sub Saharan Africa. This long term investment relationship provides the ideal case study to analyze the effects of foreign direct investment on African development. Throughout this article the author analyzes the Chinese-Zambian investment relationship, Zambian foreign direct investment, and Zambian development levels over the last four decades. The author also completes a statistical analysis to determine the developmental implications of Chinese investment. The article concludes with a series of policy recommendations that, if implemented, will enable the Zambian government to realize greater developmental gains from Chinese investment.

technophilo said...

our leaders have an habit of making tours with the family in the name of investment or improving mutual relationships. But never give importance to the actual cause.
www.technophilo.blogspot.com

pramod singh kandasi said...

China’s trade in Africa reached some $50 billion in 2006, boosting growth rates on the continent and spurring much-needed infrastructure improvements. Many African countries view Chinese investment as an opportunity and welcome Beijing’s “strictly business” policy of noninterference in domestic affairs. But China has come under fire from the international community for its refusal to pressure Sudan on the crisis in Darfur, and there is growing tension within some African countries over China’s business practices.

pramod singh kandasi said...

China-Africa relationship into categories we know from the colonial period or the Cold War. There is no evidence that China is trying to carve up Africa or form cozy relationships with a few proxy states that bow to its ideology or grant it military bases. They may be sending hard-nosed, profit-oriented investors, but China does not demand that African countries grant it imperial preferences, captive markets, or land.

ANUP KUMAR said...

Well, as a Chinese I think that it is good thing.

As you have said, China is making Africa stronger by investing there. In fact, do you know that the African Union's conference center in Ethiopia was donated by the PRC?

China is not exploiting the Africans, we are just doing business with them and that makes a big difference. We are helping them to be strong. We are sending in millions of dollars to help them to build schools, roads, airports, hydro-electric dams, railroads and etc.so

pramod singh kandasi said...

China’s top leaders made high level visits to Africa in 1979 (Li Xiannian), 1982-83 (Zhao Ziyang), 1984, 1997, 1999, 2001 (Li Peng), 1992 (Yang Shangkun), 1996, 2000, and 2002 (Jiang Zemin), and 2002 (Zhu Rongji - twice). Vice-premier Qian Qichen visited more than thirty-six African countries between 1990 and 1998. We just weren’t paying attention.

ANUP KUMAR said...

I think it's a good thing. Especially the "strictly business" part.

As outsiders, we don't have the right to interfere with other nations' problems. That's the thing with the US... Americans think they're the best so they try to force their beliefs and policies on other people.

That's a good opportunity for both Africa AND China :

subhash said...

What I like about Kerevan's introduction is his tagging the opening onto the name of James Hutton, a close friend of Smith and one of his literary excutors. James Hutton may be less well known but he was an important Enlightenment figure. As a geologist and farmer he brought to the early study of geology a knowledge of the land and by methodically studying Scotland's rocks he unravelled the mystery of the earth's origins, for which he has achieved posthumous fame.

Sunil Bhardwaj said...

in almost every corner of Africa there is something that interests China.

The continent is rich in natural resources that promise to keep China's booming, fuel-hungry economy on the road.

There is copper to mine in Zambia, iron ore to extract in Gabon and oil to refine in Angola.

In other countries less blessed by natural resources, Chinese companies have spied trading and investment opportunities.

Mukesh said...

The fundamental lesson to learn from China’s economic engagement with Africa is that Western companies are primarily answerable to their share-holders while Chinese companies are primarily answerable to the state or more specifically the CCP. Herein lies conflicting world views on how business is conducted and what the ground rules of engagement should be. Profit is not the primary consideration driving the decision-making process of major Chinese companies. Instead positional access to cheap raw materials and consumer markets, using the subsidized muscle of state financial institutions to monopolize resource access in countries to ensure a secure supply of resources to China is

pramod singh kandasi said...

All good relationships involve communication. I see some signs that China is listening. When South Africa complained about the “tsunami” of textiles from China, Beijing agreed to voluntary export restraints. When Zambian workers rioted at Chinese-owned mines, Chinese officials openly criticized the owners’ labor practices. There are clearly rocky areas in this relationship, but on balance, I see more on the positive side of the ledger here. Yes, the Chinese are certainly doing well by Africa. It is up to Africans to ensure that the net result for them, too, is good.

sujit said...

Certainly I agree with a lot of points Deborah raised—and especially the fact that China’s increasing involvement in Africa, and its financial muscle, may further reduce the already damaged legitimacy of institutions like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. It offers also an alternative route to African countries. They realize that Europe, their traditional partner, now confronted with various internal economic and social issues, cannot act in a decisive way on Africa’s challenges. America, now associated with the deployment of hard military power in its fight against terrorism, has even given a good face to China’s maneuvers, making it somehow the soft face and solutions provider of international politics.

harvinder said...

“This insight led him to his celebrated "invisible hand" idea that, while each individual is motivated by his personal interests, those motivations lead people to become more productive and thrifty, thereby increasing the aggregate well-being of society.”

vijaykumar said...

China's presence in Africa may be progressively rejected unless the Chinese understand that they should NOW take into account what the vast majority of Africans want for their continent instead of colluding with so-called African leaders in order to achieve their long-term African hidden agenda which smacks of colonialism.

Brijesh Chaudhuri said...

The Chinese have managed their political commitments excellently, with Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping visiting South Africa in 2010 reciprocating South African President Jacob Zuma’s earlier trip to China. The Chinese have overtaken the United States to emerge as South Africa’s biggest trade partner. The African continent’s biggest economy is China’s Number one source of iron, copper, manganese, chrome, and diamonds. During the meetings, President Zuma presented a wish list that included a nuclear reactor and a new $ 30 billion Chinese-financed railway.

simran said...

China has interests in Africa’s resources and mining potential. To read too much beyond this into Chinese intentions is a bit unfair on a simple business strategy.

preeti said...

The Indian Government’s recent moves to increase regulation on telecom equipment suppliers because of security concerns made news in China, given that Huawei is the most cited success story of Chinese ventures in India.

preeti said...

The Indian Government’s recent moves to increase regulation on telecom equipment suppliers because of security concerns made news in China, given that Huawei is the most cited success story of Chinese ventures in India.

preeti said...

It is not just bilateral trade that is increasing, so is mutual investment,” said Yu Ping, Vice-Chairman of the China Council for the Promotion of International Trade (CCPIT). “India is becoming an important investment market for Chinese companies”.

IIPM Best B School in India said...

The structural imbalances of South African society are only too well known. Pointless then to brush them over every time.
What may work and has perhaps not been tried to full effect yet is an all-out innovative policy generated in-house to specifically employ manpower in large numbers.
Building housing units, fixing decaying infrastruture, improving general conditions in impoverished neighbourhoods, cleaning up roadways, roadsides, trimming excessive vegetation, taking education to every community across the length and breadth of the country, etc.

anuj sharma said...

The idea to go to the private sector for jobs is a start for the ANC, but a better idea would to take up a plan like Thatcher's from the UK. South Africa needs to improve it's government, and fast. The UK is one of the better examples of a stable democracy, and Thatcher's plan in the 80's was a success to stimulate the economy, and South Africa should really look into that. The plan to cut back the foreign labor is also a big step in the right direction. By minimizing the number of foreign workers, more South Africans will be able to have jobs. In addition, the ANC must do whatever it can to provide jobs for people, before they lose all of their legitimacy. By not providing the jobs they promised, the people will soon revolt, and put in new government that has a plan, and more promising results. This process will not fix things over night, and not even in the next five years. But the results will be more prominent in a shorter period of time than through their current plan of action.

anuj sharma said...

South Africa does have a lot of promise, especially for the continent. However the government needs to simplify and create a more merit-based system that includes labour. It's current methods are somewhat confusing in principle. For example, the BBBEE whereby 26% senior managers must be non-white rising to 60% can be rounded by simply paying a set rate according to level acheived. What does that clearly imply as a message from business? It is worth paying extra rather than fill ranks with race-based quotas because my merit-based staff can more than offset in terms of productivity.

anuj sharma said...

South Africa is just another example of a socialistic/communistic government that will never offer good government to its people. It is unable to do so as it has idealogical blinders. It can not see the forest for the socialistic trees. The government will continue to misgovern South Africa until its people get rid of the looney left politicians.

pramod singh kandasi said...

Recently accelerating Asian trade and investment in Africa hold great promise for Africa’s economic growth and development—provided certain policy reforms on both continents are implemented. This is a central finding of a new book, Africa’s Silk Road: China and India’s New Economic Frontier .

pramod singh kandasi said...

China's hefty investments in sub-Saharan Africa have received deserved attention, but its investment in Latin America has been overblown by some. One reason is a common event in bilateral commercial transactions--grand announcements that never come to fruition. In mid-April Venezuela proclaimed a $20 billion oil-for-loans deal with China, but Caracas' track record in this area encourages skepticism. China has little investment in the Arab world, which is perhaps surprising in light of its focus on energy, but it has sizable engineering and construction contracts there. Australia, at $30 billion, is the single biggest draw for Chinese investment. The U.S. is second at $21 billion, Iran third at $11 billion.

pramod singh kandasi said...

As foreign investors descend into Africa, they are confronted firstly with a need for basic infrastructure. Poor infrastructure can hold back economic growth especially in agriculture and rural development. In addition, there are severe inter-regional barriers and administrative bottlenecks which often delay/hinder the development of an integrated infrastructure development across Africa. But many African countries currently lack the financial power to embark on major infrastructure ventures. It is here where Chinese engagement in Africa can make a major difference. Historically, Chinese enterprises have had some experience in Africa’s infrastructure market, having been involved in the Tanzania-Zambia (so-called Tazara) railway, the construction of dams and hydropower, and other basic infrastructure projects such as public housing and stadiums. In this sense, China is not a newcomer to Africa. The increasing penetration of China in the African market has very much been spearheaded by the major Chinese state-owned construction, telecommunication and energy exploration companies. Given the commitment of the Chinese government to support Africa’s development, companies involved in infrastructure have access to long-term financial support from financial institutions in China. This is an opportune moment for African countries to address the backlog of infrastructure investment that has kept African development at the minimum. Improving infrastructure, as China has been able to do, is therefore crucial if Africa is to record any future growth and sustain it. If managed carefully, China’s growing involvement in Africa could turn out to be one of the best examples of successful South-South cooperation in a post-American century.

anuj sharma said...

China has become a valuable partner in many ways and that China is willing to play a role in stimulating investment, which Africa sorely needs. In addition, he says China is beginning to play a larger role in providing humanitarian aid to poor African countries.

preeti said...

China is often criticized for allegedly plundering African resources without regard for the welfare of the workers and the society. Ncube says there is some truth to these assertions. He believes China should do more to create partnerships with local communities.

subhash said...

There was going to be a remake of the 1984 film Red Dawn in which the Chinese were going to be the villians who invade America. Of course the plot was never revealed, but part of the script was leaked and people in China raised hell that the film was anti-Chinese. Now MGM, the production company making the film, has decided to post pone the film’s release. Some blame it on the financial troubles at MGM, but my gut tells me that our future masters did not like the idea of Americans fighting against China on their own soil.

subhash said...

his ad is so controversal because it actually told the truth. Do you think that the endgame for China is to sell us trinkets, no. They are trying to get as much technology and scientific know how into their society in order to become a superpower. They are essentially forcing companies to transfer their know how to partnerships with Chinese companies. They don’t want to be partnered with the US companies, they want to eventually buy them out and be the Intel of th world etc. etc..

They are fighting without fighting, like Szun Tzu the greatest skill is to defeat an enemy without fighting him. They are using our weaknesses and our foibles against us and it’s working. Chris Hedges made a comment on CBC radio and essentially at the end of the 27 minute interview said that America may essentially collapse from within and we become a shattered country of many regions. Believe it or not, we did this to ourselves.

subhash said...

China has always been of high interest to me since my childhood due to the books on Mao Tse Tung that I had read. However, the surge in interest came when I went to China for the first time. The way the nation hits you is stupendous! If you were not to know which country you had come to – and if you were not even shown how the people looked – then looking at the roads and buildings, you could easily mistake it for any Western developed nation, quite unlike India or its best cities like Bangalore. And Guangzhou has been at the very centre of this mind numbing development. To put the difference between the two cities into a better perspective, in the 2010 Pricewaterhouse Cooper's Global GDP City Ranking Index, Bangalore ranks 84th with a GDP of $69 billion while Guangzhou ranks 44th with a GDP of $143 billion – almost twice that of Bangalore. Let's take a look into the journey of these two cities on the basis of some key parameters to bring about the key differences.

simran said...

Among the private commercial banks Nepal Bangladesh Bank has continued its struggles with NPA last fiscal year too. The bank’s NPA to total loans increased to 18.2 per cent in the last fiscal year from 6.42 per cent in the fiscal year 2009-10.

simran said...

The expo has over 200 stalls of housing developers, banks and financial institutions, construction material producers, interior designers and electrical equipments producers, among others.

simran said...

China’s trade in Africa reached some $50 billion in 2006, boosting growth rates on the continent and spurring much-needed infrastructure improvements. Many African countries view Chinese investment as an opportunity and welcome Beijing’s “strictly business” policy of noninterference in domestic affairs.

sailaxmi said...

China’s trade in Africa reached some $50 billion in 2006, boosting growth rates on the continent and spurring much-needed infrastructure improvements. Many African countries view Chinese investment as an opportunity and welcome Beijing’s “strictly business” policy of noninterference in domestic affairs.

sailaxmi said...

Indian Goverment has also done investments not as huge as china but it will be continious upward trend as Per Prime Minster Dr. Manmohan Singh.....

sailaxmi said...

ITs A COMPETATIVE STRATEGY OF CHINA to BECOME WORLD LEADER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

sailaxmi said...

George Osborne is due to to speak in London at about 1pm at a special sitting of parliament called after the recent rioting in the capital and across England. He is expected to defend his austerity measures, at a time when Europe's debt crisis is deepening and Labour politicians have latched on to the Bank of England's warning that the outlook is worsening

Mukesh said...

But China has come under fire from the international community for its refusal to pressure Sudan on the crisis in Darfur, and there is growing tension within some African countries over China’s business practices.

Mukesh said...

Africa has a long history of unhappy experiences with outside powers coming to exploit the continent. This is the background for Adama’s concern that China is a new “imperial power” with a “colonialist project” who will “pretend to be the savior of Africa”. Once they get what they want, Adama fears, they are then likely to “forget about Africa.”

Mukesh said...

Adama, we should be wary of slotting the China-Africa relationship into categories we know from the colonial period or the Cold War. There is no evidence that China is trying to carve up Africa or form cozy relationships with a few proxy states that bow to its ideology or grant it military bases

Mukesh said...

They may be sending hard-nosed, profit-oriented investors, but China does not demand that African countries grant it imperial preferences, captive markets, or land.

Brijesh Chaudhuri said...

I respect and share Adama’s concerns that China’s neutrality about dreadful dictators in places like Zimbabwe or Sudan makes no contribution to regime change in these countries.

Brijesh Chaudhuri said...

Chinese leaders have repeatedly stressed the principle of “mutual noninterference in domestic affairs” since the Asian-African Bandung Conference in 1955. But be careful, Adama, what you wish for. Do you really want to see a China that interferes in the domestic affairs of African countries?

Brijesh Chaudhuri said...

Is China an “unreliable partner,” as Adama charges? I disagree. China did not “forget about Africa” after 1978. China’s top leaders made high level visits to Africa in 1979 (Li Xiannian), 1982-83 (Zhao Ziyang), 1984, 1997, 1999, 2001 (Li Peng), 1992 (Yang Shangkun), 1996, 2000, and 2002 (Jiang Zemin), and 2002 (Zhu Rongji - twice). Vice-premier Qian Qichen visited more than thirty-six African countries between 1990 and 1998. We just weren’t paying attention.

harvinder said...

During these years, China also kept up an active menu of aid projects in more than forty-five African countries. Their annual aid commitments in Africa sometimes surpassed those of Japan, Norway, Sweden, and even Britain. The flurry of activity we see today has deep roots.

harvinder said...

Adama is right that the Chinese are not “philanthropists.” But they never claimed to be. Since the days of Zhou Enlai, Chinese leaders have repeatedly said that their aid program is not a form of charity but based on “mutual benefit.” One rarely sees this kind of frankness in aid programs of the West.

harvinder said...

All good relationships involve communication. I see some signs that China is listening. When South Africa complained about the “tsunami” of textiles from China, Beijing agreed to voluntary export restraints. When Zambian workers rioted at Chinese-owned mines, Chinese officials openly criticized the owners’ labor practices.

Sunil Bhardwaj said...

There are clearly rocky areas in this relationship, but on balance, I see more on the positive side of the ledger here. Yes, the Chinese are certainly doing well by Africa. It is up to Africans to ensure that the net result for them, too, is good.

Sunil Bhardwaj said...

They realize that Europe, their traditional partner, now confronted with various internal economic and social issues, cannot act in a decisive way on Africa’s challenges. America, now associated with the deployment of hard military power in its fight against terrorism, has even given a good face to China’s maneuvers, making it somehow the soft face and solutions provider of international politics.

Sunil Bhardwaj said...

Once its objectives are attained, it may just drop Africa as it did just two decades ago, when it had another agenda, forgetting about the internationalist agenda it was promoting before.

ANUP KUMAR said...

China’s claim to "help" Africa lacks credibility in the face of the way it treats hundreds of millions of its own people and vast regions that are poorer than Africa.

ANUP KUMAR said...

China is only involved in infrastructural and industrial development in Africa for one reason: Such "sacrifices" serve its own national interests.

ANUP KUMAR said...

China's complacency toward African leaders is eroding a healthy trend. Political structural adjustment, meaning real democratization and the entrenchment of better economic governance, are no longer priorities.

vijaykumar said...

Even if the China "model" proves to be effective, the inconsistencies and failures of Western nations and institutions are not enough to leave this Asian dragon to destroy essential values to Africa’s development.

vijaykumar said...

I agree with your conclusion, Adama. Development does begin at home. Better leadership and better governance are key. Where does China fit here? Will China’s large loans to corrupt leaders upset the good governance agenda? Will new Chinese loans pile more debt onto countries recently emerging from HIPC loan cancellations? Will Chinese oil investments in Sudan, Nigeria, and Angola fuel the “resource curse” and make a mockery of human rights?

vijaykumar said...

It’s fair to question the governance impact of China’s expansion in Africa, even if (in Washington, anyway) the critique rings a bit hollow (we are shocked, shocked, that China is giving loans to odious regimes!). But China has learned from the West. They’re not operating in the same way. Loans from China don’t get deposited into a dictator’s bank account and promptly sent to Swiss bank accounts.

suri said...

In Angola, for example, China’s recent $2 billion and $2.4 billion Eximbank credit lines were tied to infrastructure investments. Teams of Chinese are already in the country building roads, rehabilitating railways, and building schools and a huge neighborhood of low-cost housing. Thirty percent of the contracts under the loan are targeted to Angolan firms.

suri said...

Angola pays for this infrastructure with oil. Compare this with the completely non-transparent $2.35 billion loan extended to Angola by Britain’s Standard Chartered Bank, Barclays, and the Royal Bank of Scotland. Do I sense a double standard here?

suri said...

China has also been proactive on Africa’s debt burden. They regularly cancel the loans of African countries, loans that were usually granted at zero interest. They do this without the long dance of negotiations and questionable conditions required by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund

pramod singh kandasi said...

Of course this worries the international financial institutions: Their leverage is weakened. But as William Easterly has demonstrated, there is scant evidence that conditionality ever worked to bring about economic growth in Africa.

pramod singh kandasi said...

Chinese leaders do see the costs of stepping into oil-based conflicts. Fourteen Chinese were recently kidnapped in two separate incidents in Nigeria, where China has large investments. China has become a major investor in Sudan, an oil market off-limits for the United States because of congressional sanctions

pramod singh kandasi said...

When Chinese president Hu Jintao visited Sudan just last week, however, journalists reported that the Chinese president “chided” his Sudanese counterpart, delivering a “blunt message” on the crisis in Darfur. True, China is not going to push for democracy. But political stability and a more peaceful and prosperous Africa are clearly in its interest.

sujit said...

The opportunities highlighted by Deborah are certainly there, but let us not forget that China is not in Africa for philanthropic reasons. It is another imperial power pursuing its national interest, and it can be an unreliable partner despite its claim to build a true equal partnership with Africa.

sujit said...

Don’t forget that at the end of the 1970s when it decided to focus on its internal challenges, China’s leadership forgot about Africa. That they invite now African leaders for grandiose gatherings such as the China-Africa Summit should not fool us. Even at that gathering it was almost an insult to African leaders who were forced to queue up to greet the Chinese president just before the opening ceremony as if, for a country so much concerned with symbols, to show that Africa was paying tribute to its new tutor.

sujit said...

The figures mentioned in terms of new funds from China to Africa may be impressive, but their primary target is to help China secure markets abroad. Beijing has learnt the lesson of Japan after World War II, when it built its recovery through securing captive foreign markets

sujit said...

The money China is giving Africa is far from being enough to address the level of financing needed by the continent.

sujit said...

Don’t be surprised also to trace that money to countries that will give back more to China either in terms of diplomatic support or in natural resources. This interest-driven approach will only offer a cushion to those in Africa who are champions in siphoning the continent’s foreign aid. Is it not time to put in place an international tribunal to prosecute financial criminals who do even more damage in Africa than the warlords?

sujit said...

Chinese officials are not prepared to accept the real message coming out of Africa. Instead, they prefer to deal with African predators not concerned with the necessity of improving the lot of their nations.

mohit said...

hinese do so coz they have huge brains over small bodies and they utilize most of it, they can view thier future in far good condition.
indian govt. has small brains over huge body and that too is used to lead india towards the tides of shame.

this is where the difference lies. they(chinese govt.) donot waste time saying that the previous govt has done this or that. they utilize this time to show them that look this is how the future govt should take the country towards the rising sun.

mohit said...

chinese belive new so it,s not wonder for them but it,s a lesson for india

mohit said...

Arindam nice article. . .an eye opener for govt . .the truth is we have an inefficient and a directionless leadership. .there are no ambitions and future plans in their rotten minds. . .

mohit said...

our country stil growin so y we think about other country for investment
What about Indian Investment in swiss and many tax heaven countries

mohit said...

It's called investing in under valued socio-economic environment & assets which will give wind-fall gains in future and foothold on the region.We need such teams at all levels from pvt sector's to GOM so that they can identify before any other could even imagine.

mohit said...

We r hvng our own targets no need to wry abt dis we shld keep in mind dat Indian co. TATA has alrdy took ovr a south africn co.

gaurav said...

Hey guys the case is k indians explored the opportunity in african continent in early 80's, but the main reason was we were not able to capitalize on the gains. We have more logical and practical brains than ne1 has in this entire universe. Mark This words. This is proven fact, which every1 has accepted.

gaurav said...

India has a future growth of max 20 years after that the only continent unused will be Africa its got potential but companies will have to work a lot for utilizing those resources..

gaurav said...

TCS together with china's HXB has won best core banking award. i suppose chinese are ready to trust indian private companies........

Gaurav said...

Very Interesting article.Thasnks to Arvinadam.What China is doing in African countries is a long term strategy.Indian misnisters have no time to think beyond theirconfined mind set.The US economy is down graded.Britain is burning in conflicts of racism.We are still believer in strucure of castism.So, It's next to imposible for India & European countires to hug the Balck people give them equal opportunities. But China, for last few decades, have not only consistently been in touch with African countries but strengethned the relationship and developed the infrastructe and thereby capturing the natural resources of Africa and spreading its Red culture.Realy this is a long term strategy.INDIA must develop its relationship with AFRICAN Countries.

Gaurav said...

I see immense opportunity and nothing else. India should have done this in early 2000's. We were going strong then. it would have given us a head start. It is not late either.

Gaurav said...

unlike china which trade keeping selfish motto's, ours is always mutual. being the number 1 always gives us a lot of pressure, lets be a steady growing economy with mutual benefits to everyone

Gaurav said...

There is no need for India to look at china or any other country for its development. Priyanka, How you can say about small brain in Indian. If you see today India is super power on knowledge economy and all world look towards India to implement knowledge in there economy or social system. We are the people who are master in Information Technology, we have our own resources to feel proud. We are not debt trap country like US and Europe. Mr. Arindham, If you check the Chinese treasure and its banking system it is worst now. They are local government system is hunger for money liquidity because as per chines law they can not float Bond's to mobilise money. Join me 4 detail analysis.

Gaurav said...

50 years ago world leaders use to follow indian leaders , now indian govt is following US. We could neither kept our natural friendship intact (made by our forefathers/ancestors) nor cultivate new friendship which is of use on issues related to present national/international issues. The present global scenario doest wait and watch...... they made people to watch. No action from Indian govt, only discussions ...... which are of no use. Indian brain power doesn't get platform to work in unison....... No such system exist in Indian Govt. Money alone can not make things happen

Gaurav said...

China can never be a role model. they are exploiting their own citizens, there poverty line is huge...while there Govt is indebted too, despite to the fact that they have so much $$$$. I believe none nation should do what China is doing... because of that rich nation are enjoying low cost product while chinease are suffering in their own country.

Gaurav said...

its v.confident that the aid given by the china to africa...is betr then the world bank's support!!its a shamefull learning fa all countries such US who looks out the prestige in its all dealing and India too hafta learn tat how china supports a weakener nation to uplift it...and work for global cause

anuj sharma said...

I think, it's a great strategy for China. They not only develop their efficiency but also planning for dominating the world in future. On the other-hand, the development of India is quit slow. It is affected by corruption and terrorism which hamper the growth of the country.

anuj sharma said...

Dear Arindam, after a little gap I got the opportunity to express on your long writings. Thank you so much and the entire TSI team. I am a regular rather vociferous reader of your journal, which always keeps me above the average without any kind of compromise. The moot question is dragon is not roaring against India commercially but had been trying to overpower our power any manner since the collapse of the Vajpayee govt. There is an anti-Indian attitude of most neighbours of this open landed vast chunk of land known as India.

anuj sharma said...

The steps of chinese in becoming the power full nation can be felt. What about India's international relation in the regard? Are we heading in the right direction of are we too busy with our internal politics?

vijay said...

The relations between the China and Africa can be summarized as long-lasting and close friendship. Both China and Africa are among the birthplaces of human civilization. They came to know to each other and began indirect exchange of commodities as early as the 2nd century BC..My Egyptian friends told me that many dresses of Queen Cleopatra was made of Chinese silk

vijay said...

After World War II, the Sino-African relations entered a new stage of all-round development following the birth of New China and the proclamation of independence by a number of African nations. The Chinese leaders of the older generation and pioneers of African national liberation movements joined hands in opening a new chapter in the annals of friendly and cooperative relationship between China and Africa.

vijay said...

I""d like to emphasize here that the late Premier Zhou Enlai headed a Chinese government delegation to 10 African states between the end of 1963 and the beginning of 1964, namely Egypt, Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia,Ghana, Mali, Guinea, the Sudan, Ethiopia and Somalia. During the visit, he put forward the Five Principles for relations between China and African and Arab countries as well as the Eight Principles for China""s aid to foreign countries

kandasipsk said...

For a long time, the cooperation between China and African countries in the political, economic, military, cultural, educational and medical fields has been carried out on equal and friendly terms and with fruitful results. Sino- African friendship has thus struck deep roots in the hearts of the people. I would like to highlight the following aspects in Sino- African relations.

kandasipsk said...

Close Sino- African political contacts Since the founding of the People""s Republic of China, there have been over 150 visits to China by 49 heads of state of African countries, and over 40 visits by more than 20 heads of government. Hundreds of ministers of African countries also paid visits to China. Many African leaders have made several visits to China. They have forged a profound friendship with their Chinese counterparts and become old friends familiar to the Chinese people. Since China""s economic reform and open up, exchanges between China and Africa has become more frequent.

kandasipsk said...

The late President Yang Shangkun visited Morocco, Tunisia and Cote d""lvoire from June to July 1992. In May 1996, President Jiang Zemin made a successful visit to Kenya , Egypt, Ethiopia , Mali, Namibia and Zimbabwe, and delivered a speech entitled "To Set Up a New Historical Monument for the Sino- African Friendship" at the OAU headquarters. It was a historical visit oriented towards the whole Africa, during which initiatives were put forward for the development of Sino-African relations of long-term stability and all round cooperation oriented towards the new century.

subhash said...

Extensive cooperation between China and Africa in the fields of culture, education and health By the end of 1997, China had signed government agreements on cultural cooperation with 42 African countries and 65 action programs on cultural ex changes. Scholarships have been offered to around 5,000 people from 51 countries, with more than 800 African students now studying in China.

subhash said...

Inter college contacts have been established between 10 Chinese Universities and 20 Institutions of higher learning in 16 African countries. More than 400 Chinese professors and lecturers have been sent to Africa and teaching labs have been set up in 19 African countries. Over the past 35 years,19 hospitals with around 2,000 beds have been built with Chinese aid, and a total of 15,000 Chinese medical personnel dispatched to 42 African countries. The Chinese doctors have attended to more than 200 million patients and are renowned for their superb medical skill and noble ethics on the African continent.

subhash said...

China and Africa always support each other in international affairs and jointly work to safeguard the just rights and in terests of the developing countries. The moving scene of the lawful seat of China in the UN being restored in 1971 remains fresh in people""s memory. Among the 76 countries casting affirmative votes, 26 were from Africa, accounting for one third of the total.

subhash said...

In international affairs China consistently pursues an independent foreign policy of peace. China does not enter into alliance with any big power or group of countries, nor do we establish military bloc or seek military expansion. We oppose hegemonism and safeguard world peace. We are committed to the establishment of a just and rational new international political and economic order. China hold that all countries are entitled to choose social systems, development strategies and lifestyles that suit their own conditions. We uphold the good-neighborly policy and will strengthen our solidarity and cooperation with the Third World countries, support and closely cooperate with each other in all areas to safeguard our lawful rights and interests.

preeti said...

The Chinese Government and people always attach great importance to Africa. Africa is the largest developing continent in the world, with rich natural and human resources, and a huge potential for economic development. Fifty-three African countries make up about half of the membership of the Non- Aligned Movement and nearly one- third of the UN membership, representing an important and active force for preserving and promoting world peace and development.

preeti said...

There would be no lasting peace in the world without peace and stability in Africa, nor could there be prosperity and development in the world without the revival and development of Africa. Africa is still facing many difficulties and challenges, and there are even wars and conflicts in some regions. However, as a whole, desire for peace, stability, development and cooperation has become the mainstream of the situation in Africa. Many African countries are actively exploring ways for stability and prosperity suited to their national conditions.

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